everything old is new again

apparently
 way back when
  in the late 1700s
 george washington 
lived in a rental house on cherry street
 not far from the battery 

the battery
 lies 
at the south end of manhattan

 more recently
the battery
redubbed
 battery park
 extended 
up along the westside of manhattan
 segueing 
into
 hudson river park
 which
 is the last leg
 of
 riverside park

 it was bordered
 to the east
 by the westside highway 
(route 9w)

 but 
things change
 while staying the same

 the battery 
spawned 
battery park city
 and 
the park itself
 which
 also has a marina

 the westside highway 
once elevated over a cobblestone street 
was torn down
 the cobblestones beneath it
 replaced

 its new name 
west street

 battery park city 
likely 
won't change its name 
but
 what was once the battery
 is 
now
 once again
 the battery 

if i haven't bored you yet 
you can read 
more 
about 
here 

i can see battery park city 
from my office aerie 

last time 
i actually walked
 along there
 was
a year ago july

 i hope to get there again soon
 it sounds like a nice way
 to spend a fridaycation

 its got some spectacular views


6 comments:

  1. Can't say that I exactly followed the name changes, but it's interesting how history in a city evolves. I've always liked that so very much. You know, I was once helping out in my older children's elementary school and found out that a street in my hood, named Moodyville, was named after a certain Captain Moody, who was mayor in these parts in the mid 1800s and as a matter of fact, the whole beginning community of North Vancouver was called Moodyville at one point. Love that photo and the turbid river. Will click thru on your link and find out more. :D

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  2. I find it more and more important to dig into the history of the spaces and places where I live and work. Thanks for your post today and for the spectacular photo you've placed with it.

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  3. The new york city photograph has made a colorful, vivid re-creation of the legendary artist’s Mexico City garden. It perfectly echoes her passionate, vibrant life.
    Lush foliage and vivid yellow flowers surround a bright blue wall proclaiming “Frida y Diego vivieron en etsa casa, 1929-1954.”
    Visitors pass this entrance and enter an oasis of nature—zinnias, calla-lillies, Lady’s Eardrops, giant green philodendron leaves—an explosion of color and plants and flowers cocoon the garden paths.
    More varieties of cacti than have possibly ever shared the same space rise in all their prickly glory out of flower beds and terra-cotta pots.

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